Posts tagged ‘Los Angeles’

April 8, 2013

Flappers, Suffragettes and Civility on Streetcars

The term flappers in the 1920s referred to a "new breed" of young women who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.

The term flappers in the 1920s referred to a “new breed” of young women who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.

A quarter of a century ago, before Los Angeles became such a busy mart of trade, there was more sociability, more friendliness, more pleasant words and smiles on street cars in one day than there is now in a week, according to Edward H. Link, one of the oldest conductors in point of service, employed on the city lines.

“No woman wanted to bite you when you said, ‘Step forward in the car, please.’” he said. “No one threatened to call the police, telegraph the Governor and hang the motorman when the power went off. No one minded waiting a few minutes while the team of a big bay horses struggled to move the dray stalled in the mud on the track. But let a car get tied up in traffic now, and listen to the remarks” Look at the impatient tap-tap-tapping of feet on the floor and see the irritable looks on the faces of the passengers!”

read more »

Advertisements